Archive for the 'Splint Covers' Category

Santa Cruz Hat and a Gallery Invitation

Check out Maya modeling her new Santa Cruz Hat, made by Thea of Baby Cocktails and Knitting. What a lovely smile!

Girl in a Santa Cruz hat

Girl in a Santa Cruz hat

One of the really fun things about Ravelry is that I’ve been able to see my patterns knit up by other people and to get their feedback on my designs. Of course, not everyone is on Ravelry (yet!), so I’m only hearing from a subsection of the folks who’ve knit my patterns. In the spirit of inclusivity—and, I’ll admit it, because I get a thrill out of seeing my designs knit up by others’ hands—I’ll soon be starting a gallery on this site.

To make things interesting, I’ll turn the gallery into a sort of lucky draw. Every time I receive photos of ten new items for the gallery, I’ll put those knitters’ names into “the hat” and draw out a winner, who will receive a little knitting something: maybe some yarn, maybe a hand-knit dishcloth, maybe some of the patterns I sell through one of my LYSs. To be entered, just send a pic of your version of any one of my patterns to shATwhatifknitsDOTcom (Melissa will be uploading these and asks that you try to keep the documents to a reasonable size). And if you’d like your picture in the gallery to link back to your website, include that address.

Right now, I have the following patterns available free on-line (and more will be coming soon):
Basic Wrist Warmers
Bulky Tam
Point Lobos Hat
Reversible SWS Hat
Sandia Hat
Santa Cruz Hat
Splint Covers
Stripes and Strands Hat
Tamalpais Hats (4 versions)

Enjoy! And please, let me see the results—it does my knitterly heart good.

October 12 2007 | Basic Wrist Warmers and Bulky Tam and Patterns and Point Lobos Hat and Reversible SWS Hat and Sandia Kids' Hat and Santa Cruz Hat and Splint Covers and Stripes and Strands Hat and Tamalpais Hat, v. 1.0-4.0 | 6 Comments »

K to J to M

Ok—this time instead of telling the knitting purists to go to the end of the entry, I’ll start with some quick knit news and then ramble.

This weekend I got two more splint covers knit up for my niece in lacier patterns. The one that worked best began with four rows of K2, P2 rib, then switched to alternating rows of K2, YO, K2tog and YO, K2tog, K2, ending with four more rows of rib. This produced a sturdy, but lacey diagonal mesh.

I knit most of another face cloth as well, this time using Rhonda K. White’s Lacey Round Cloth pattern. It’s quite pretty with its mix of garter and eyelets. I’m also delighted with the zig-zag border. This business of connected wedges turning into circles interests me. I want to keep knitting up patterns like this until I get to the point that I can design my own. (The “what if” questions: What if I adapted this technique to a shawl? To a hat? Could I maintain the laciness while working on a larger scale or would everything just go all clunky?)

By the way—if you’re like me and can only find Sugar ‘n Cream, but not Peaches & Creme in local shops, you can order this yarn directly from the maufacturer. Peaches & Creme has a much wider color range and is reasonably priced, even with postage, if you order one-pound cones.

And that is all the knitting.

This morning when I woke up, Sparky and Woody lay curled in one another’s arms at the foot of the bed. Sparky was completely zonked, and Woody had his eyes open the littlest squinty bit and was giving Sparky’s left ear a very thorough washing. They used to sleep together like this all the time, but have grown more independent now that they’re “big boys.” (Big is right—each of them looks as if he’s swallowed a small cannon ball.)

Then Woody woke up a bit more, decided to groom himself, and—to facilitate grooming, no doubt—sat down right on top of Sparky and got to work on his own hind foot. This brought Sparky out of his stupor, and we had a few minutes of “Woody must die! No!—Sparky must die! No!—Woody must die!” before things settled down again.

This little skirmish made me think of my favorite columnist, Jon Carroll, who not only writes great political and thought pieces, but also can conjure up a cat column extraordinaire. (See here and here and here for a few examples.)

And thinking of Jon Carroll cat columns made me think of my mother, who brings great joy to my life by providing me with a custom clipping service. (This, of course, is only one the myriad ways she brings joy to my life, but it’s the way I’m focusing on at the moment.) I don’t get a paper daily paper. Instead, I subscribe to the New York Times on line, which provides good general news coverage, runs twenty automatic, customized searches a day for topics of interest (my choices range from Church and State to Supreme Court to Patriot Act to Lemurs), and allows me to create my own database of materials in areas of interest, which comes in handy for my teaching.

So, by using the NY Times and other sources (particularly NPR), I get my daily news, but I don’t get a daily paper. This is where my mom comes in. Every single day, she goes through both of the newspapers she and my father receive and clips every item that might be of interest to me. (She actually does this times three, as she also sends clippings to my brother and sister.)

Articles on new dinosaur species? Check.
Articles on any kind of fossil at all? Check.
Pieces on educational innovation? Check.
All things knitting, quilting, embroidery, and sewing related? Check.
Geology? Check.
Astronomy? Check.
Monterey Bay Marine Sanctuary? Check.
Retirement planning? Check.
Political cartoons on education? Check.
Cat Care? Check.
Crossword puzzles? Check.
Mutts? Check.
Get Fuzzy? Check.
Rhymes with Orange when it’s got cats in it? Check.

and

Every single column Jon Carroll writes? Check.

Once or twice a week, I get a wonderul, fat envelope full of these clippings. They make for great just-before-bed or soaking-in-the-tub or sitting-in-the-yard-on-a-beautiful-day reading. Kittens to Jon Carroll to Mom. It’s a perfectly logical chain of thought.

March 19 2007 | Cats and Patterns and Splint Covers | 1 Comment »

Splint Covers: The “Pattern”

If I’m reading the hand-signs right, my niece loves her splint cover.
I love my splint cover!
The pictured splint cover is knit in Lion Brand Yarn’s Jiffy, the Denver colorway. Another splint cover should be arriving today, in Crystal Palace’s Trio, the discontinued Kiwi-Celery colorway. (Let’s hear it for the LYS’s odd skeins and discontinueds sale bin!) I’m afraid the Trio will snag easily, but it was fun to knit with (I started fantasizing about a knitted tee for myself) and made a dense, stretchy fabric that should be comfortable to wear. And the splint covers only have to last six weeks or so.

Nice stripes.
I’m working on a lacier version now, based on the stitch I used for the Santa Cruz Hat. The weather’s starting to change in the midwest, and the girl needs to have options.

Meanwhile, here is the “pattern.”

Take three measurements (while the recipient is wearing the splint):
1. Circumference, which should be pretty much the same along the length of the splint
2. Distance from the “notch” of the of the thumb-forefinger L up the arm to the end of the splint.
3. Distance from the “notch” of the thumb-forfinger L down the hand to the other end of the splint.

For my niece, these measurements were 10″, 8.5″, and 2″.

Using the gauge information on the yarn band and appropriate double-point needles, cast on a number of stitches that is a multiple of four and that will be approximately equal to the splinted-arm circumferance (measurement #1). (I used U.S. 10.5 needles and cast on 40 stitches.)

Close the circle, place marker, and work in K2, P2 rib until you have a length equal to measurement #2. At some point on the following round, cast off four stitches as you continue working in K2, P2 rib. Then, on the subsequent round use a backwards loop cast-on to restore those four stitches. This will be the thumb hole.

Continue working in K2, P2 rib until the distance from the thumb hole to the end of the piece equals measurement #3.

Cast off.

Voila—a splint cover. It’s still not as glamorous as a cast, but it’s way more glam than an unadorned, clunky brown splint.

Coming next: a veritable cavalcade of washcloths with pattern information and links.

P.S. Last night Melissa and I went to a performance by Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble (on-line recordings here). Tonight we’re going to hear John Holloway with Philharmonia Baroque (on-line recordings here and here). Heaven!

P.P.S. We just found out today that Melissa has a neighbor with a pomeranian named—get this—Lobo.

March 17 2007 | Patterns and Splint Covers | 5 Comments »